#HistoryTO Series - Geological History of Toronto (and the surrounding region)

Jan. 15, 2020

https://wgnhs.wisc.edu/wisconsin-geology/ice-age/

Jan. 15, 2020
wisc.edu


Climate change—the long view - Set of 43 maps showing the position of ice in Wisconsin, beginning at 31,500 years ago and ending at 11,000 years ago - Developed by David Mickelson and John Attig (Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey, University of Wisconsin–Extension)

Jan. 15, 2020

Set of 43 maps showing the position of ice in Wisconsin, beginning at 31,500 years ago and ending at 11,000 years ago - Developed by David Mickelson and John Attig (Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey, University of Wisconsin–Extension) - Visit http://wgnhs.org/wisconsin-geology/ice-age/ to learn more and download the maps

Jan. 11, 2020
wikipedia


75,000 to 11,000 years ago

“The Wisconsin Glacial Episode, also called the Wisconsin glaciation, was the most recent glacial period of the North American ice sheet complex. This advance included the Cordilleran Ice Sheet, which nucleated in the northern North American Cordillera; the Innuitian ice sheet, which extended across the Canadian Arctic Archipelago; the Greenland ice sheet; and the massive Laurentide Ice Sheet,[1] which covered the high latitudes of central and eastern North America. This advance was synchronous with global glaciation during the last glacial period, including the North American alpine glacier advance, known as the Pinedale glaciation. The Wisconsin glaciation extended from approximately 75,000 to 11,000 years ago, between the Sangamonian Stage (known globally as the Eemian stage) and the current interglacial, the Holocene. The maximum ice extent occurred approximately 25,000–21,000 years ago during the last glacial maximum, also known as the Late Wisconsin in North America.” - Wikipedia

@HistoryTO3 / #HistoryTO #TorontoHistory #QuaternaryPeriod #WisconsinGlacialEpisode #WisconsinanGlacialEpisode #SouthernOntario #GeologicalHistoryTO #UrbanGeology