Dec. 10, 2016

The projected ridership of the Crosstown is 5,500 passengers per hour in the peak direction by 2031 - The capacity of an LRT is 15,000 passengers per hour, per direction - LRT cars can be removed or added easily, thus providing the flexibility to accommodate ridership demands - thecrosstown.ca

Aug. 31, 2016

A rendering of what the LRVs that will ply the Eglinton-Scarborough Crosstown LRT line will look like. Up to three of the sleek, Euro-style cars will be linked together to carry as many as 840 passengers at a time, at an average speed of up to 32 km/h, including stops - (Metrolinx)

Aug. 31, 2016
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By Wendy Gillis - Staff Reporter - thestar.com - Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012

Aug. 31, 2016

The dividing line between what Americans reference as a streetcar and what they call light rail is not nearly as defined as one might assume considering the frequent use of the two terminologies in opposition. According to popular understanding, streetcars share their rights-of-way with automobiles and light rail has its own, reserved right-of-way.

But the truth is that the two modes use very similar vehicles and their corridors frequently fall somewhere between the respective stereotypes of each technology. Even the prototypical U.S. light rail project — the Portland MAX — includes significant track segments downtown in which its corridor is hardly separated from that of the automobiles nearby. And that city’s similarly pioneering streetcar includes several segments completely separated from the street.

Aug. 31, 2016
humantransit.org

Posted on March 26, 2010 in Light Rail, Melbourne, Portland, Rail Transit, Stop Spacing, Streetcars (Trams)